Tag Archives: Wyoming

Morning Glory Pool, Yellowstone, Wyoming

This image is a look into the depths of the Morning Glory Pool. It is one of the easiest thermal vent pools for tourists to see, but this has led to the deterioration of it’s colors.

Genuine Natural Color Made by Dexter Press, Inc., West Nyack, N.Y.

The caption states:

3954 – Morning Glory Pool, Yellowstone National Park. This is perhaps the most noted of the dozens of beautiful hot water pools occurring in the park.

–The deep blue of the pool shown in this image is long gone. Tourists have dropped so much foreign material into the pool that it’s biome has changed, and the blue is completely gone, replaced with a pale green ringed by orange and red.

This image likely dates from the 1940s.

Old Faithful Inn and Geyser, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

This image shows the driver’s entrance and main door to the Old Faithful Inn. In the background is a artist’s rendition of the eruption of Old Faithful geyser, world famous for its clock-like precision of timed eruptions.

Genuine Curteich-Chicago “C.T. Art Colortone”

The caption states:

OLD FAITHFUL INN AND GEYSER

Old Faithful Inn and Geyser are in the upper Geyser Basin of Yellowstone where the largest and finest geysers in the world are gathered within a space of a mile. About Old Faithful is another of the Park community centers and supply points with stores, camps, museum, bath house, etc.

— The exterior look of the Inn has changed little over the years. The geyser is predictable to a range of about 15 minutes, averaging an eruption every 74 minutes.

This image dates from the 1940s.

Tower Falls, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

This image shows the spectacular view of Tower Falls, an easily accessible feature located in Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming.

Genuine Natural Color Made by Dexter Press, Inc., West Nyack, N.Y.

The caption states simply:

Tower Falls near Tower Junction in Yellowstone Park.

The falls are 132 feet in height. Most notable is the boulder shown at the edge of the precipice. It is no longer there, having succumbed to erosion and gravity in 1986.

This image likely dates from the 1940s.