Tag Archives: Arizona

Navajo Bridge, Marble Canyon, Arizona

This image shows the Navajo Bridge, which crosses the Colorado River over the Marble Canyon in northern Arizona.

Fred Harvey Post Card

The description states:

HOTELS – SHOPS

FREDY HARVEY

RESTAURANTS

This bridge over the Little Colorado River at historic Lee’s Ferry, 143 miles northeast of Grand Canyon Village, is 467 feet above the river with a span of 833 feet. It is the only means by which automobiles can cross from the South Rim to the North Rim of the Grand Canyon within the state of Arizona.

–The bridge shown here was completed in 1929, but with the passage of time was deemed insufficient to handle the loads and traffic volume of more recent vehicles. Another bridge was constructed in 1995, and this bridge closed to vehicles, though it remains open to pedestrians, bicyclers and bungee jumpers.

This card likely dates from the 1940s.

Bell Rock, Lower Oak Creek Canyon, Arizona

This image is of the formation known as Bell Rock, a butte near the town of Sedona, Arizona.

Kodachrome Reproduction by Mike Roberts for Intermountain Tourist Supply, Phoenix, Ariz.

The description states:

C646–BELL ROCK, LOWER OAK CREEK CANYON

One of the outstanding rock formations in this beautifully colored valley is Brilliant Bell Rock.

Buttes are steep sided formations exposed by erosion often containing small flat tops. Larger flat topped formations are called mesas. This formation is located in the center of Arizona.

This image likely dates from the 1950s.

Window Rock, Arizona

This image shows the natural formation that developed from erosion, creating the opening in the rock. It is the site of the  Navajo national capital, and is known in English as Window Rock.

Kodachrome Reproduction by Mike Roberts Studios, Berkeley 2, California

The description states:

K2–WINDOW ROCK, ARIZONA

Below this window rock is the location of the Central Navajo indian Agency.

–Since the time of this photo the Agency has been rededicated as a national capitol. The rock is one of the four┬áplaces nearby used in Navajo water ceremonies.

This card likely dates from the 1950s.