Monthly Archives: June 2015

Desert Scene

This postcard is an artwork with poetry and commentary illustrating some of the clichés of the desert as they were understood in the mid-20th Century.

C.T. Art-Colortone, Western Publishing and Novelty Co., Los Angeles, Calif.

There is no description on the back of this card. There is handwriting there, and it appears to list the titles of several popular songs of the time, the most obvious being “I Found a Million Dollar Baby”, which was published in 1931 and first performed by Fanny Bryce, then recorded by many others, including Bing Crosby, also in 1931. This indicates the card likely dates from the 1930s.

Harvey House and Park, Needles, California

This image shows the so-called Harvey House in Needles, California. In fact, it was named the El Garces Hotel, and was also a restaurant and train depot for the Santa Fe railroad. It was built in 1908.

Harvey House and Park, Needles, California B9679

There is no description on the back of the card.

The building still stands, though the train depot is long closed it still functions as a transit center for the city of Needles. The automobiles shown indicate this image is from the 1940s.

Golden Canyon, Funeral Mountains, Death Valley, California

This image shows the so-called Golden Canyon of the Funeral Mountain range in Death Valley, California. The canyon name may be an alternate description of the north end of Death Valley, as the Funeral Mountains form the northern border of the valley.

Golden Canyon, Funeral Mts. Death Valley National Monument, California

There is no description on the back of the card. The Death Valley National Park is not a true valley. Instead, it is a graben, or a block of land that has been lowered by tectonic activity between two other rising blocks. It became famous for it’s borax mines which provided soap and laundry powder to the U.S. consumer in the middle of the 20th century.

The lonely automobile shown in the image indicates the card likely dates from the 1930s.