Monthly Archives: April 2015

Grant House Kitchen, Galena, Illinois

This image shows the kitchen of the Grant home where he and the family lived between the end of the Civil War and his election to the Presidency in 1868.

Anscochrome by Clayton Forsythe

The description states:

KITCHEN, GENERAL U. S. GRANT HOME

GALENA, ILLINOIS

This room is furnished with typical furnishings of the 1865 period. The stove, table and four chairs are original furniture used by the Grant family.

–Note that there is no running water, as evidenced by the presence of the porcelain pitcher and washbasin in the left foreground, and the absence of plumbing fixtures over the wood framed sink in the center background. The railing again is installed to control visitor movement in the museum.

This image likely dates to the 1960s.

Grant Home Parlor, Galena, Illinois

This image shows the cosy parlor of the large house where Grant lived for a few years after the conclusion of the Civil War.

Anscochrome by Clayton Forsythe

The description states:

PARLOR, GENERAL U. S. GRANT HOME

GALENA, ILLINOIS

This room has the original horsehair-covered, walnut furniture that was in the home when given to the Grant family in 1865. The vases on the mantel were a gift to the General, while on his world tour, and are Bohemian glass. This home is now a state memorial and is open to the public daily. Admission free.

–The railing visible is a museum addition to keep visitors from encroaching on the carpets and furniture.

This card likely dates from the 1960’s

Grant Post-Civil War Home, Galena, Illinois

This home, considerably more substantial and elaborate, was a gift to the General and his family upon the successful conclusion of the war.

Anscochrome by Clayton Forsythe

The description states:

HOME OF GENERAL U. S. GRANT

GALENA, ILLINOIS

This home was built in 1857 by Alexander Jackson. Either years later it was purchased by the City of Galena, furnished and presented to General U. S. Grant on his return from the Civil War. In 1904 the heirs of the Grant estate deeded it to the City as a memorial to their father. In 1932 it became a state memorial and is open to the public daily. Admission Free.

–The family remained here briefly, moving to Washington DC after Grant’s election to the Presidency in 1868.

This postcard was used and is dated 26 April 1963.